Quick school me on gun pics

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by wood chucker, Jan 26, 2015.

  1. wood chucker Moderator

    Member Since:
    Dec 19, 2012
    Message Count:
    1,599
    I like most all the gun pics on here. Sometimes for the content, sometimes for the composition, sometimes for the story they tell.

    So I got a 10 mega pixel pocket camera. You'all seen my cell phone pics :confused:
    This coming week end I'm going to need to make good pics instead of take snap shots.

    School me up quick, what have you got for advice ?
  2. PT109 Active Member

    Member Since:
    Aug 20, 2014
    Message Count:
    225
    Try to keep your toes out of the pic! :) Best pics I see are from a guy named Stickman, usually on AR15. Aritficial lighting really helps detail/shadows and angles to get more out of the pic instead of just straight on.
  3. wood chucker Moderator

    Member Since:
    Dec 19, 2012
    Message Count:
    1,599
    Thank you. Lurking through the pics here and then going to look for the stickmans stuff to try and reverse engineer what y'all are doing. With luck and a healthy dose of monkey see monkey do I might get lucky. Shooting and shooting will be out in the bush at the skunk works test range with lighting and weather as God sees fit.

    What picture size you guys recommend for posting here ? Besides shooting firing, mostly the pics are to be of rifles, individual parts and ventilated targets.
  4. kylemcintyre67 New Member

    Member Since:
    May 2, 2015
    Message Count:
    23
    Quality photography is all about quantity. Way cheaper to do these days than the old 35mm days.
  5. NFA Member

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    Sep 20, 2015
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    wood chucker likes this.
  6. Ridge Runner Member

    Member Since:
    Dec 27, 2012
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    118
    I can't give expert advice on lighting, but the background adds greatly to some gun pictures. I often use a deer hide, or an old brown jeans jacket. Some guys with military packs, camo, knives, mags, etc. make some very interesting photos. Using my Nikon, I find the camera picks up every bit of dust or oil smear on the gun. I can't seem to get the gun clean enough. Any advice with this issue would be appreciated.
  7. PT109 Active Member

    Member Since:
    Aug 20, 2014
    Message Count:
    225
    Ahh yeah those hi-megapixel cameras are a pain. When we started using them to film commercials years ago our sets, props and especially the actors make-up had to be re-learned. Every little mistake shows up. No quick answer for that really. Moving light sources around and sometimes even spraying everything with water helps to distract the eye. You may notice on TV how often the background has been wet down for effect. Micro fiber towels and possibly a blast of compressed air for the dust but get the pic quickly or the dust will return. An alcohol wipe will get rid of a lot as well. My .02!
  8. NFA Member

    Member Since:
    Sep 20, 2015
    Message Count:
    40
    I agree with the micro fibers and alcohol wipes. Dust is a real pain that even photoshop has problems with. Best thing is to keep trying until you get the pic you want.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  9. spamassassin Well-Known Member

    Member Since:
    Aug 8, 2014
    Message Count:
    1,113
    You need soft but bright light and you need to cast shadows deliberately not accidentally, otherwise eliminate shadows. Staging the scene and framing the shot are other big points. A gun laying on a blanket has no depth or character. That same pic with toes in it is just shoddy effort. You need layers of depth and to avoid monolithic subject matter. Here's a decent example. This was staged on a pile of bricks next to my fence. It's not a great pic by any means, I didn't try really hard either. Still, that pic was taken with a cell phone on an overcast day. It looks pretty good because it was well staged. You can see in the pic the effect of proper staging, there is some action to it. The way that the radio and the ammo and the rest of it is sitting looks almost like it was in use while the pic was being taken.

    [IMG]

    Making sure the whole scene is in focus is also vital to the outcome.

    Glare and un-managed shadow kills quality, you can see that in this pic. The lighting is terrible and the angle of the shot is pretty darned boring:
    [IMG]

    Here's an example of an otherwise good pic with big focus problems. It's also pulling an odd angle. It should have been taken from further to the subjects left and from a lower elevation. That would have concealed the TP and played on the fact that there's a lot of interesting things going on in the pic. Oh, and we completely cleaned the snot out of that campsite before we were done. It was destroyed when we got there and looked like a park when we left. Don't leave campsites cruddy. It just makes work for those of us that can't deal with a big mess.
    [IMG]
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