PTG has a new barrel nut

Discussion in 'Modifications' started by GrocMax, Jul 28, 2015.

  1. wood chucker Moderator

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    Don't thank me thank your fellow forum members. All I did was post it up.
  2. GrocMax Active Member

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    Jun 12, 2014
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    I FINALLY got around to making my own assembly jig and trying the PTG nut out, and honestly I was able to get it tight enough during trial assy with a regular old crescent wrench, and no marks.
    wood chucker likes this.
  3. wood chucker Moderator

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  4. GrocMax Active Member

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    Of what? Boobies? Yukky rifle parts?

    I'm resistant to the social media generation's overuse of pics/video every time their dog sneezes or kid gets an A, can't get order from chaos regardless of what 'they' say.
    jason.hayes3 likes this.
  5. Al in Mi Active Member

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    Nov 19, 2014
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    maybe of your assembly jig ;)

    I for one always like to see what other have come up with
  6. Rclark18 New Member

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    Jan 20, 2016
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    Pacific Barrel Nut

    Attached Files:

  7. GrocMax Active Member

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    Jun 12, 2014
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    I found a junky offshore no-name 1 1/16" 12 pt 3/4" drive socket in the back drawer fits the PTG nut perfect. Bored the square end to a little over barrel size, weld a handle on, in bidness.
    wood chucker and Keith like this.
  8. mjc New Member

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    Mar 2, 2016
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    Just general info. PTG has released a new "crows foot" style barrel nut wrench, listed on their web site now..
    wood chucker likes this.
  9. BSJ Member

    Member Since:
    Jul 6, 2013
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    I know why the crescent wrench didn't leave marks. These nuts are CRAZY hard!!!

    The only thing that will cut them is Carbide tooling. Doesn't make any sense as to why they made them this hard...
  10. Kent New Member

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    Apr 24, 2014
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    It makes even less sense as to why this would be considered a problem(?) Hard is good for barrel nuts, too.
  11. BSJ Member

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    Tough is what's needed. Hard can be brittle.

    The factory nut can be cut/drilled with ordinary high speed steel. There's no need for the nut to be 65+ HRC!
    wood chucker likes this.
  12. Kent New Member

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    Apr 24, 2014
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    OK, one more response. This seems like a "so what?" thread.
    -True, but there is no need to cut or drill the either the factory nut or the PTG nut if they are torqued properly.
    -In this particular application, extra hardness is not a factor. If anything, it may be more durable for a switch-barrel rifle.
    -It would take something higher than Rc65 to become truly "brittle".
    -If you really want to know the PTG nut hardness, ask them. I'm sure they would oblige.
  13. BSJ Member

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    Jul 6, 2013
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    Maybe you don't need to drill the nuts, but I do. I've drilled mine for set screws. As I don't want to have to mess with the headspace every time! With a 23mm hex on the muzzle, I don't even have to remove the action from the chassis. A truly switch barrel system...

    (Pre-bluing and coating)
    IMG_2143 crop.jpg

    And I've milled a pocket, so that I can use the tool I already have to torque the nut. Instead of buying yet another one from PTG.

    (F-class setup)
    IMG_2169 (1024x575).jpg
    wood chucker likes this.
  14. Kent New Member

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    Now, I can see where you are coming from, and that deserves another reply.

    I envy your having the capabilities to do all that machining, and that takes skill. Nice work, by the way. My capabilities are very minimal, just enough to switch Savage and Mossberg barrels. I simply use temporary match marks to return to the original headspacing, crude and more time-consuming, but it works for me.

    If you have the means, why don't you just hex the chamber end and do away with the nut? Just curious.
  15. BSJ Member

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    I prefer the infinite adjustability of a nut, over the fixed position of a shoulder.
    wood chucker likes this.
  16. wood chucker Moderator

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    What he ^ said and it makes things easier when set back the barrel, clean up the chamber and re cut the throat time rolls around.
  17. Keith Moderator

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    Dec 7, 2014
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    For my $0.02, I have generally like the flexibly that a nut has over something you have to fiddle with to get the timing right. Sure, they might not look as sleek and pretty but they are so much easier to work with and no special tools are needed.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  18. GrocMax Active Member

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 2014
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    Every barrel of mine I've had that started to get a bit washed out in the throat/leade it has so much groove fire cracking and land wear in the first couple inches a short setback isn't worth the hassle.
  19. Barry Hedrick Member

    Member Since:
    Sep 20, 2015
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    no strip wrench.jpg

    If we can find the Heyco style wrenches in 27mm I believe this would work! These actually use the flat of the nut instead of the hex. We use these at work and let me tell you they WORK

    Not having any luck finding anything larger than 25mm though. Maybe someone with better searching skills can drum a link up.
  20. GrocMax Active Member

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 2014
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    A std 1 1/16" 12 pt works fine. Search the local pawn shop/junk store.
    S1Loki and Barry Hedrick like this.

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