MVP VARMINT 24" bbl. 5.56x45mm -300yds in windy conditions

Discussion in 'Mossberg MVP Rifle General Discussion' started by skeeter, Apr 16, 2017.

  1. skeeter New Member

    Member Since:
    Feb 17, 2017
    Message Count:
    16
    Last Friday I returned to the High Desert Rod and Gun club in Morongo Valley to test my ability to shoot those small bullets (55g FMJBT) in windy conditions at 300yds at 11 inch round steel hanging plates. After my success the previous outing I had to know just how difficult it would be to hit smaller targets ( from 16 inches down to 11 inches) in windy conditions. Well, I found out that I am not good at determining wind speed. Wind direction was easier to determine as there are several wind flags positioned at 100yds at both extreme sides of the rifle range. I had estimated the wind at full value (90 degrees to my muzzle) and 20 mph. I shot 5rds and had no idea where the bullets hit. I think the most valuable asset in shooting long distance is a "spotter". I don't have one. Linda the RO for the day was asked her guess as to the speed of the wind. She pulled out here Kestrel wind meter and told me about 10mph. So, I had 26 clicks of right windage cranked into my scope and should have had only 13 clicks. Linda also mentioned that her wind meter only registered the wind at the muzzle and the speed and direction would change throughout the 300yds between my muzzle and the 11" steel plate. She said that usually the speed would diminish a little because of the shape of the canyon. So, I corrected my windage setting and sent a round down range. Boom-there was impact on the steel. I sent a second round and hit the steel again. On the 3rd round just before the trigger broke a gust of wind came up and the bullet missed the target. I forgot to shoot between wind gusts. I made a .2 MIL windage adjustment to center the hits on the 11 inch steel plate and then hit 9 for 9. I learned that one needs a good spotter and if that is not possible a wind meter is a good accessory to have. I was happy about hitting 11 inch hanging round steel targets at 300yds. I was not happy with my inability to "dope" the wind. I am learning about shooting in the wind.
  2. spamassassin Well-Known Member

    Member Since:
    Aug 8, 2014
    Message Count:
    1,069
    Wind reading is the single most difficult skill to learn and learning can only happen when you miss. It's a bit like learning to land a plane. You only learn useful stuff in the last 7 seconds before touchdown so it can take literally hundreds of landings to learn much.

    To see exactly how big a challenge it is, consider how correct the RO was by watching 10 seconds or so of the video below. It should be set to play from shot 4 of stage 7. If it starts at the beginning just forward to 2:20 and play the next minute from there. You can actually hear how hard the wind is blowing and it's going from right to left so I was thinking full value 10mph when I asked coach to confirm. My coach can be heard telling me to zero my wind despite the howling of it at the forward firing position (FFP). As you look across the valley you see all kinds of hills and valleys at all kinds of directions to each other. Coach has shot at that range for 30 years and knows the winds there pretty well. When he said zero wind I dutifully zero'd my wind hold. I missed that shot but only high. My wind was dead on.



    If you want to learn really how to shoot in heavy wind, do like I do: Hit the Mojave valley around late september and shoot in 35-60mph winds. If you can do that, you can do 5-15mph. FWIW, the last state championship I did for high power metallic silhouette was done in 30-45+mph full value gusting winds and heavy rain. Shooting offhand in those conditions was tough but not impossible. Just takes lots of shots to learn. In that match I had dialed all the windage my scope could do (about 20MOA) and was holding off between 10-45MOA more. When I shot the last rimfire championship match we had 3/4 value winds from zero to 20mph gusting. I did the whole match with no wind dialed and occasionally holding off 1-2MOA but mostly holding dead center.

    Another thing to know is that wind WILL be different at the ground than 10ft off the ground than at 30ft off the ground. I actually have an equation that describes this but it's not practical to use in the field. It is important to know that as your bullet rises above LOS toward its maximum ordinal that the wind effect on it will continually change. So, more practice.
  3. robertmagni Member

    Member Since:
    Apr 2, 2017
    Message Count:
    32
    Beautiful scenery! Here in Florida flat as a board
  4. skeeter New Member

    Member Since:
    Feb 17, 2017
    Message Count:
    16
    Thank you for sharing your video and for the advise on shooting in the wind. You seemed to have mastered it. I don't think I have enough years left to significantly improve my marksmanship abilities in windy conditions. I will however, seek advise from knowledgeable RO's at the rifle ranges that I frequent.

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