How old is too old?

Discussion in 'Shotgun' started by Marneaus, Oct 11, 2015.

  1. Marneaus Moderator

    Member Since:
    Jul 31, 2013
    Message Count:
    477
    As mentioned in the shotgun pics thread I have always wanted a Winchester 1897. Well walking through cabelas the other week I spied that corn cob ribbed foreend and knew what I saw!

    I have a thing for old guns with a history. I like to think about where this thing has been and what stories it could tell. This one was Built in 1910-1911.

    There are two minor dings in the barrel I will have repaired, and there is some pitting in there as well but I don't think it's terrible. Absolute worst case I may have the barrel cut if my gunsmith doesn't think its salvageable. Hardly a trace of any blue left, only on the mag tube. The take down locks up nice and tight and has plenty of adjustment left in the collar. Action feels good and it functions 100%. Had one small split in the wood behind the trigger guard that wasn't structural. I packed in a little epoxy to keep it from getting any worse which I doubt it would have.

    All in all not bad for a 105 year old!

    The best part? Price tag was $150 :-D

    [IMG]
    [IMG]
    [IMG]

    [IMG]
  2. spamassassin Well-Known Member

    Member Since:
    Aug 8, 2014
    Message Count:
    1,129
    Most of my most used shotguns are at, over or very near 100 years old. As long as they're in good shape and tight they're usually good to go for a few lifetimes. I frequently admonish people to be aware of the old 2 5/8" chamber being a possibility and advise that the oldest of them should be used only with gun club loads, avoiding field and game loads and anything with high brass. Otherwise the average 100 year old shotgun is probably a little better to own than the average 1 year old shotgun until you step up into the high price and high quality spectrum where things get expensive fast.

    I shoot trap with a Savage 21 from the mid 1920's, a Savage 745B from the early 40's, a remington 1900 with custom ordered KEF barrels from around 1905. They do need repair now and then and I keep spares of things like extractors and small springs. My Savage 21 is going in today for a left side extractor replacement. Guns from that time are works of art. Elegantly crafted walnut and steel and they're usually take-down guns for some reason. The one above is almost a barn-find and was a helluva bargain. Well played.
  3. cwlongshot Member

    Member Since:
    Sep 9, 2015
    Message Count:
    53
    I have one too, its a sweat heart! t saw rough use and its barrel was badly pitted in the last 12". I lopped it off at 19.5" and added a 1/8" brass bead. the tow of the stock was cracked off too. I chopped almost 2" off it and added a nice 1" gel pad. Its fast to shoulder and easy to point.

    [IMG]

    I haven't had it out in awhile, I need some new pics.

    CW
    wood chucker likes this.
  4. Ulfberht Training and mentoring the next generation.

    Member Since:
    Dec 23, 2015
    Message Count:
    111
    "Good working order" speaks for itself, unless a person wants to shoot steel sh*t out of an old full choke.

    I was shooting some heavy non-toxic sh*t out of my 1985-era wingmaster; unbeknownst to me, the screw-in choke tube wasn't rated for steel sh*t....it peeled the barrel back 8" like a banana.

    Remington got an ear full, I got the satisfaction of paying for a new barrel and steel choke tubes.

    Edit: I inherited a winchester autoloader, it shoots trap like it is new.
  5. cwlongshot Member

    Member Since:
    Sep 9, 2015
    Message Count:
    53
    Steel shot should not be fired thru any full choke constriction.

    Flipping Mossberg F'ed everyone up with steel tubes and lead tubes. Flat out WRONG! People are stupid and don't think.

    Rem chokes, all under full have always been steel shot safe.

    Steel is hard, it dosent deform. Also because it stays round it patterns tighter, so you don't need as tight a choke!! Just like years before when you wanted better patterning shots hells you got copper plated. WHY? Cause copper resists deformation resulting in tighter patterns. Well not much is harder than steel... Then steel isn't as dence so it starts out faster but slows faster too. That's why many shooters did and don't do well with it. It simply shoots differently than lead.

    Fixed chokes in general are not good choices for steel shot.

    Sorry to read you learned the hard way.

    CW
  6. Ulfberht Training and mentoring the next generation.

    Member Since:
    Dec 23, 2015
    Message Count:
    111

    Not me, in retrospect, life has been a good experience for me, no regrets.

    If it doesn't kill you, it will only make you stronger !
    cwlongshot likes this.
  7. tevan0707 Member

    Member Since:
    Feb 27, 2015
    Message Count:
    81
    Seeing this just makes me want a 97 even more! All beautiful guns!
    Ulfberht likes this.

Share This Page