Bore Scope

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by hombre243, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. hombre243 Member

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    Nov 16, 2014
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    Hi all,

    I am considering buying a bore scope. Does anyone here have one or know who sells them?

    Thanks
    skg
  2. guthepenguin Member

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    Feb 7, 2014
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    If you're talking about a laser bore sighter, start of by checking Amazon.
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  3. hombre243 Member

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    Nope, looking for a bore scope...so I can look into the bore. I have a collimator for bore sighting. I have seen them mentioned on forums but cannot remember which one.

    PS I got both BSA collimators from Amazon.
  4. guthepenguin Member

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    Ooooooooooooh. The flash light thing, right?
  5. hombre243 Member

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    It works just like a colonoscopy camera, butt goes into a long hard barrel, not a soft yucky one. :eek:
  6. Josh Turner Member

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    Mar 3, 2014
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    My buddies shop has one that he purchased from Brownells. I cannot remember the brand but I can remember the yellow sticker on the box the case is in. I will see what brand he has. They are super expensive! I know the only time he uses it is to inspect barrel blanks to check for imperfections before he chambers them. He didn't find anything wrong with my last Shilen blank ;).
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  7. Chuck S Active Member

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    Nov 15, 2013
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    Using Google I'm seeing prices in the $4,000 range that are long enough for the entire bore. Shorter ones are commonly used to look at engines, fuel injector, etc. and are in the $2,000 range.

    -- Chuck
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  8. hombre243 Member

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    Josh and Chuck: I found out that this tool was way out of my budget. I did find a cheaper version somewhere but it was still more than i am willing to spend. The flexible tube the lens is attached to was too big anyway so I abandoned the idea. Thanks for the replies.
    h
  9. Chuck S Active Member

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    Back in the day when we had rifled tank cannon -- they've been smooth bores for decades now -- we had the requirement to bore scope them periodically. Amazing things happen to the rifling in these cannons! Artillery pieces still get this inspection but velocities are much lower and there's less wear.

    An issue with borescoping rifle caliber barrels is the need to look 90° to the bore access to closely examine the walls of the barrel. There are little cameras that may fit down the bore but I've never used one thru a hole much smaller than a spark plug hole to examine piston carbon deposits. Some of these run under $200 but are not true borescopes as they look forward and not to the sides. I've seen 5.5mm advertised (for inspection of plumbing) but I think the real bore diameter is 5.64" so you'd have to try it to see if it fits. "Calibers" are notional, not exact measurements.

    -- Chuck
  10. hombre243 Member

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    Nov 16, 2014
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    Thanks Chuck,
    My findings are that the little scopes I have found are a couple thousandths larger than bore dia. I didn't bother ordering one. I abandoned the idea after shooting some near 1 hole 5 shot groups at 100yards. I don't need more accuracy than that to hit a coyote.
  11. hombre243 Member

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    Nov 16, 2014
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    Mods, I think we can close this thread. I have learned what I need to know.
    Thanks
    hombre
  12. wood chucker Moderator

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  13. spamassassin Well-Known Member

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    People looking at getting one should really consider their reason why they want it. I've used them in the past but not to inspect status so much as to detect a specific condition. If you think looking at machined metal at small scales is going to give you a chance at much info that will be useful to the layman, you're not so much mistaken as overly optimistic.

    If you shoot a LOT, like shooting competitively and know what a carbon ring is or what fire cracking is in the context of rifle barrels and you know what a those look like and why you might not want them then the borescope might be handy. If you high volume shoot a seriously overbore magnum calibre and are concerned about bore life then it might be useful or might not occasionally to let you know it's time to get a new pipe or not. Regardless, until and unless you know what you're looking at you're just enabling the taking extremely expensive pictures of the inside of your barrel with one of these. A competent gunsmith will likely have one and if you suspect that you may need the use of one, pay your gunsmith for an hour of work and let him look at it and tell you exactly what he saw and what it means. You'll help a small-business and get useful results for less money.

    Remember, most things you can find out about are likely to not be things you can change and almost anything you find out about is just going to stress you out.

    FWIW, even as a competitive shooter I don't own one. No need. If I need to use one, I have a gunsmith that I like and he does have one and 50 bucks is a lot less than 300.
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  14. X Ring Accuracy Member

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    Apr 13, 2014
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    We have a bore scope. Its somewhere packed away. Haven't used it in quite some time. There is information to be gotten from them but they can also scare the hell out of you. I have seen barrels that look like 5 miles of gravel road and shoot 1/4 MOA all day long. We have also seen nice shiny, lapped bores that wont shoot worth a flip. It was fun to look at chatter marks on new blanks, see cracking in front of the throat, but proof is always on the paper target.
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  15. hombre243 Member

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    I wanted one to check for damage to a barrel when I stuck 2 bullets (very low pressure loads) end to end about 3/4 of the way to the muzzle. I eventually found a You Tube video explaining how to get the bullets out using homemade Trail Boss Blanks and some water. Worked like a charm. I wanted to check for damage I caused but after shooting it I found there probably is no damage. I had used a brass rod and an aluminum rod after I shattered a wood dowel inside the bore. I imagine it looked like a junk yard down there before i got the bullets out but it shoots pretty tight groups and I doubt I could improve them because I just ain't that good a shooter anymore.

    I appreciate the Lyman link though...I did not know they had one. There is still a chance though. I like new toys.
  16. X Ring Accuracy Member

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    The trail boss works. I do shy away from water as its not compressible. What we use is a cleaning rod with the bullet pusher brass end. You would be surprised how fast a squib bullet can be pushed back out the breech with just pure gravity dropping on the lodged bullet. Happy shooting.
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  17. hombre243 Member

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    That is the best reason to use water. Do you know any immovable object that hydraulic pressure cannot move? The barrel is way stronger than rubber. I fired 3 shots and did not have enough Trail Boss to do the job. I had to drive 20 miles home, make some more stronger blanks, using 6 grains IIRC and the second shot pushed out both bullets at the same time and no damage to any part-of the rifle.
  18. spamassassin Well-Known Member

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    Hey hombre, it's easier than that to check for belling of the barrel. If it's damaged by 2 bullets being in the barrel at the same time you'll almost certainly see a dark ring that doesn't move as the light changes when you look down the bore. Go to google images and look up "squib ring barrel" for examples.
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  19. hombre243 Member

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    Yep. I found a strong light and used it and there are no marks or any damage at all.
    Thanks
    h
  20. spamassassin Well-Known Member

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    Glad you got out of that without damage.
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