200m High Power Silhouette Match Results & Video

Discussion in 'General Firearms Discussion' started by spamassassin, Feb 8, 2016.

  1. spamassassin Well-Known Member

    Member Since:
    Aug 8, 2014
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    The first Sunday of every month there's a 200m high power metallic silhouette match that my coach and I try to make it to as part of the normal circuit. Normal silhouette is 200,300,385,500m. This is a partially scaled course with the animals all down-scaled to maintain 2-3MOA at 200m. Weather was ok with periodic swirling strong gusty wind but it spent most of the day just toying with our emotions and not affecting shots much. When it did affect them it was full value 20MPH wind which requires holding off the animal to hit it.

    I found a glitch with my form during the match and fixed it which caused me to pick up another 4 animals and really dialed in my aim-small-miss-small when there's wind pushing on me. That was a big gain for me and I went up about 15% in hit percentage overall and 700% specifically on turkeys which I normally have a bit of trouble with. I'll usually hit 1:10 turkeys unless the day is particularly sparkly. This time I'd already fixed my form and natural point of aim was easier by far to establish and maintain and target transitions were cleaner.

    All shots are taken off-hand, no slings, palm rests, shooting jackets or shooting gloves. Targets are 2-3MOA steel silhouettes and weigh between 5 and 15lbs. One of the guys ended up popping the head off of one of the chickens with a .308. A .308 is kinda a bit much for this game at 200m. I use a 7mm BR which is about as powerful as a .30-30 but with better bullets and range.

    I shot first in my class and put a leg in the next higher class with a score of 20 of 40. The other winning scores were 24,25,26 with 26 taking the overall match win. My coach shot a 19 which is horrid performance for him.

    Enjoy the video below. It's a quick compilation of largely unedited footage.



    Thanks to my PRS spotter The Disco Tripper for taking the video through a spotting scope on an iPhone. That was a lot of hard work for him to keep the video moving during a fast moving match. Also thanks to my coach and silhouette spotter Seargent Schulz. His coaching helped me pull in 2-3 hits that I otherwise might not have had without such an awesome spotter. Remember, your spotter tells you where to shoot and you obey his orders strictly. You are the instrument, he is the weapon system commander. Never second guess your spotter. If he needs second guessing then the wrong member of your team is the spotter. The spotter should be the best shot. The shooter should be the weaker spotter.
  2. Keith Moderator

    Member Since:
    Dec 7, 2014
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    You typically try to have the better shooter be the spotter or does the two not necessary correlate?

    Nice shooting!
  3. spamassassin Well-Known Member

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    The most experienced and proficient shooter should be the spotter for most things when there's the option for that. The spotter's job is not just watching, they actually call the ball. When I go to a silhouette match and my coach isn't able to be there I'll try to get a spot from one of a few specific people that are regulars in the area because I know they're better than me at it and they know their stuff. Apart from telling you where you hit they're questioning your break point and giving you constant wind info and, and this is the most important part, telling you where to break the next shot. In a match you're under time pressure and you have to pay attention to your form and do the 24 other simultaneous things that it takes to make the shot in the first place while also paying attention to basic gun safety and trying to focus on the trigger-pull:sight-alignment coordination, etc... the last thing you want to be doing is trying to figure out where to aim. That's because while I might think, hell know, that I; my brain, told my finger to break the shot with the center dot sliding upwards through the target just as it hits the leg body junction, that's not where it actually breaks and the human brain is very bad at admitting that to itself. So you have to give yourself over to your spotter and they'll take your report of where you broke the shot along with the actual POI and come up with a break point for the next one that, if you do what they tell you to, will hit. I still occasionally don't take my coaches word for it and that usually causes me to miss but only usually which makes it a hard habit to completely break.

    In belly crawling pursuits, as far as civilian stuff, I'd still want the more experienced guy spotting but they usually like to shoot too and need their turn once in a while.

    In a military situation, my understanding is that when there's a proper spotter:sniper team set up in a hide the most experienced guy tends to take the spotter role but I don't have any direct knowledge of that, nor recall where I came across that possibly apocryphal bit of info and the few actual snipers I know well enough to ask haven't had experience since Vietnam when the American sniper doctrine was more or less, "Oh you know how to use a scope, here's you a sniper rifle. Go kill someone."
  4. DINKY DAU Member

    Member Since:
    Oct 2, 2015
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    Congrats I don't shoot completion but I'm sure it has to effect the nerves


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  5. spamassassin Well-Known Member

    Member Since:
    Aug 8, 2014
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    Actually I'm far less nervous in competition than when hunting. When I get up to the line in a match it's me against me and the clock. Nobody else beats me, only I do that. Other people might win but I'm not concerned about that. That's a very relaxing mindset.

    When I go out to hunt on the other hand, that's when the fear of hunt mates pulling a point-n-laugh creeps up. Even though those guys would never do that. If I bugger up a shot on game it's not just the pending point and laugh that bothers me. I know I'll have likely tortured an animal which in my family is one of the most serious sins one can commit. Much worse than any disrespect to an elder or any property crime, torturing a critter is a good way to get uninvited from Christmas.

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